Kitten Proofing Your House

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http://blog.cfa.org/kitten-proofing-your-house/

Devon Rex Kittens in WindowBefore you get kitten home, there are a few things you will want to do to make sure your home is safe and secure for your new addition.

  1. Close off all areas that a kitten can get into. Many kittens have been lost for a time because they are afraid in their new surroundings.
  2. Designate one room where your kitten can stay to get acquainted with her new surroundings. Make it a fun place with new toys, a new bed and litter box so that he understands that this is his room. Once acquainted, usually after a week, let your kitten begin to explore other areas with your supervision.  If there are other pets, gradually introduce them to your new kitten.  Wait a few weeks so that your kitten gets confident and comfortable in his new surroundings.
  3. Get your kitten on a schedule as soon as possible. Regular feeding, grooming and play time gives your kitten a sense of order and security.  Refrain from over-handling.
  4. Be sure to kitten-proof other areas. Just like babies, they love putting things in their mouth.  Make sure that electric cords are unplugged and that there are no other hazards in the vicinity. You may have to get on the floor to “see” what your kitten sees.  Having plenty of appropriate toys around will focus your kitten on the right things.
    Persian Kitten with Flowers

Have fun as you introduce your kitten to his new surroundings and he will soon realize that this is his forever home where he can grow and have comfort and support for a lifetime

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‘How can I reduce dander?’ and other veterinary FAQs

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http://meowblog.cats.org.uk/2016/03/how-can-i-reduce-dander-veterinary-faqs.html

Do you have a burning question for a vet about your cat? Have a read through the advice below from Cats Protection vet Vanessa Howie, all covered in her recent live Q&A on Facebook.

Brushing your cat
Photo by Brendon Connelly via flickr / Creative Commons 

Question: What’s the best way to try and reduce my cat’s dander or dandruff? Constant (assisted) grooming with a brush? Is there something in their food that can help? Or other coat products?

Answer: If your cat is suffering from excessive dander/dandruff then I would recommend that you get your cat examined by your vet. Supplements which contain omega 3 and 6 may help to condition the coat and reduce dandruff formation. You may find our skin disorders leaflet helpful too.

Question: My 18-year-old cat was recently diagnosed with dementia. She is yowling most nights from about 4-6am and just sitting staring at a bookcase. She’s also quite vocal before and after going to the toilet. Can you help please?

Answer: Sorry to hear that your cat has been diagnosed with dementia. There is medication and a number of supplements that may help improve brain function, I would recommend that you talk to your vet about these. I would also recommend maybe keeping a light on overnight (particularly if your cat’s vision is deteriorating with age) and keeping routines and the house layout the same to avoid confusion. You may find our elderly cats leaflet helpful.

Question: One of my cats, Rory, seems to wash himself more than needed to the point where he has created small bald patches. There are no scabs or dry skin though. Why is he doing this?

Answer: I would recommend that you get your cat examined by your vet in the first instance. There are a number of reasons a cat may begin overgrooming, including having a skin allergy, being in pain or stress. Ruling out skin parasites such as fleas is the first thing to do and your vet can advise on the best products to use both on your cat and in the environment – they can also check for fleas and flea dirt on your cat. Have a read of our skin disorder leaflet (linked to earlier) for more information.

If your cat is overgrooming you need to find out the underlying cause. Photo by Douglas O’Brien via flickr / Creative Commons

Question: My young cat seems to drink a lot of water. He does also eat a lot of dry food though, is this a problem?

Answer: Cats that eat mainly dry food will drink more than a cat that eats either only wet food or a mixture of wet and dry food. Wet canned food tends to contain around 75 per cent water so a cat will obtain a large proportion of their daily water requirement from the food. However if you feel your cat is drinking in excess I would recommend that you get him checked over by your vet. Measuring how much water he is drinking in a 24-hour period will be useful for the vet to know.

Veterinary note: Please note that we are unable to give specific advice on your cat’s health or any change in behaviour observed. For medical problems, consult your vet who will have access to your cat’s medical history and will be able to examine them.
Would you like to ask one of Cats Protection’s feline experts a question about your cat? Don’t miss the next live Facebook Q&A sessions: Nicky Trevorrow will be answering behaviourial queries on 14 April; Vet Vanessa Howie will be back on 28 April; and Jane Clements will be taking neutering questions on 12 May. All Q&As are held on Cats Protection’s national Facebook page from 2-3pm. See you there!

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Easter Hazards

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http://blog.cfa.org/easter-hazards/

Photo: bob in swamp / Foter.com / CC BY

Photo: bob in swamp / Foter.com / CC BY

It’s that time again when Spring is upon us and we look forward with great anticipation to the upcoming Easter holiday and nice, long days of summer ahead.   With 10 to 12 million lily plants produced annually, the lily is a very popular plant to receive as a gift, especially during this time of year.

Cat owners must be aware when bringing lilies into their homes. The following species are known toxins to cats: The Easter lily, Tiger lily, Day Lily, Rubrum lily, Japanese Show Lily, as well as other members of the Liliaceae family can all cause kidney failure in cats. In most plants, the leaves are known toxins along with the stems and flowers in certain species. With some species, cats can eat as little as two or three leaves which can result in liver failure and, if left untreated, can cause death if not caught in time.

Photo: flores do meu jardim / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

Photo: flores do meu jardim / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

If you catch your cat eating a lily plant, contact your veterinarian immediately. Should your cat ingest lily plant material, he may vomit, have diarrhea, became dehydrated and lethargic and develop a lack of appetite. As internal damage progresses, symptoms can become more intense without prompt, appropriate treatment by your veterinarian. Take the plant along when you take your cat to the veterinarian to make it easier for your veterinarian to prescribe the proper care and treatment.

If you receive a lily plant, take extra caution to make sure that the plant is out of reach and kept away from your cat, especially if he likes to nibble on things. Rather than struggle with the problem of where to put the plant, you may decide that cats are more fun and more decorative than a plant and just ban them from your home.

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